Nurse Wisdom from the ICU at OHSU (4.29.19)

Posted: Mon, Apr 29, 2019
“Scars are beautiful. Wear them as a badge with honor. They will remind you that you are stronger than you think you are. Your scars will tell a story of resiliency and that you refused to be broken.” Scars are visual reminders that you are stronger than whatever tried to break you. Scars are sacramental. [...]
“Scars are beautiful. Wear them as a badge with honor. They will remind you that you are stronger than you think you are. Your scars will tell a story of resiliency and that you refused to be broken.”
Scars are visual reminders that you are stronger than whatever tried to break you. Scars are sacramental. They are an outward sign that out of suffering a new person emerged. When we own our scars inviting them to tell a story of resiliency and beauty, it prevents the scars from owning us.
Elizabeth Kubler – Ross wrote, “The most beautiful people we have known are those who have known defeat, known suffering, known struggle, known loss, and have found their way out of the depths. These persons have an appreciation, a sensitivity, and an understanding of life that fills them with compassion, gentleness, and a deep loving concern. Beautiful people do not just happen.”
There is a strength and beauty that come from scars we don’t find any other way.
Mark Nepo in his poem Etched wrote,
“We’ve been told that scars are ugly.
I think they are beautiful traces of how we are touched by life.
To have known no blemish means we have fallen through time with no meaning.
What’s the point? To die unchanged is it to be an arrow that never lands.”
Trace your fingers over a scar, own your story and remind yourself you are stronger than you think you are.
Tell someone their scars are beautiful and ask them to tell the story of their scars and notice the light shining in the depths as they tell their story.
Light reflects off the jagged edges of a broken bottle as much as it reflects off a diamond.
#spaciouschristianity #ohsu #spirituality#woundedhealer